Listing Presentations and Scripts

FSBO Converter Phone Script

YOU: “Hey (contact name), my name is (Your Name). I’m calling because I saw you had tried out my real estate information hotline and wanted to use that to get more buyers interested in your home.

I want to get that setup for your home. This service is something I offer to local home sellers to help them sell their home.

The service is completely free with no obligation. I know that if the info line enables you to successfully sell your home, then you may refer your friends and family to me.

It only takes a few minutes for me to stop by and get the info line setup for you. I could swing by this Wednesday around 3.00-ish. Would that work for you?

If the lead says, “Yes”

YOU: “Great, I will plan on seeing you this Wednesday around 3.00-ish.” Hooray! You just got an appointment.

If the lead says, “No,” then continue, “(contact name), let’s imagine that there is someone that is interested in buying a home in your part of town. They drive past your house and call your number. No one answers. They don’t leave a message.

The wife says, “I don’t like (X)” and they drive away. Later that week they find another house they like and buy it.

They would have loved your home and bought it, but they jumped to conclusions and didn’t buy it. If that happens tomorrow, then you miss out on an opportunity to sell your home.

Fact is, an agent I know did a study and found out that about half of the people that end up buying a home drive past it before seeing the inside.

If you don’t have a way for them to get all of the info on the home, then you are missing out on half of the buyers.

I don’t want that to happen to you. Let’s do this. It takes less than five minutes for me to stop by and get the info line setup for you. I could swing by this Wednesday around 3.00-ish. Would that work for you?”

YOU: “Perfect! I’d love to stop by and take a quick look at your home so I can give you the best evaluation possible. I could swing by this Wednesday around 3.00-ish, or is there a time Wednesday that works best for you?”

Lead: “Yeah, that would work” or another affirmative answer…

YOU: “Great, I will plan on seeing you this Wednesday around 3.00-ish.”

If they say “No” again, then tell them again about how this will help them and ask for the appointment. 

My Final Notes.

The key is to keep on pushing for the appointment. If they say no, resell them on it and ask for the appointment.

Remember these two things.

1. You are offering something of value that will increase their odds of selling their home.

Here is a quick story that illustrates this point. I worked with a buyer a few years ago, and the listing agent lost out on a sale simply because she quit work at 5 PM. A buyer was buying a home in Gainesville, Florida.

They were moving from Orlando. They drove to Gainesville on a Saturday and drove around town on their own. They drove thru a new construction neighborhood named Weatherly. It was around 6 PM when they drove thru.

The Model Home closed at 5 PM. Since there was no one there to help them, they drove out and continued on their way.

I got in touch with them a few days later and started helping them. They were planning a second trip to town on the following Saturday. I showed them a few homes.

One of those homes happened to be in the new construction neighborhood they drove thru the week before. They liked one of the homes in the neighborhood and were thinking about making an offer.

However, I continued showing them other homes. At the end of the day, they were torn between two homes; the new home in the neighborhood they had driven thru the week before, and another home listed with an agent that was a great friend of mine.

They ended up buying the other home because I pushed them towards it and sold them on the amenities in the neighborhood.

But, I know that if the model home had been open the week before and they had seen the new home with the model agent, then they would have bought that house.

They would never have seen the other home, and no one would have shown them the great amenities the other home had to offer.

That Ladies and Gentlemen is the power of info lines. You should put it on every single one of your listings. Every single FSBO should be using it. Not using it is crazy!

It cost that agent a $5,500 commission and their seller a sale! 

2. There is no cost, obligation, or anything else negative that is coming out of this. They have nothing to lose except for 5 minutes of their time! 

Include in your listing presentation or send it in a flyer.

Feel free to change this up or put this in a powerpoint with your own experiences and practices. This is a long guide for FSBOs with checklists and information on what they have to go through. After seeing this with you or in their mail, they will really realize how much work this is going to be. 

Property Preparation

Take a deep breath, because you’re going to need it. Pricing is tough, but the next part is time-consuming and a bit nerve wracking to be quite honest. There are several steps that you need to take in order to prepare your property for showing. The time-consuming part is why I suggest that you give yourself a little stint between actually deciding to sell and putting a sign out front. 

Lots and Lots of Paperwork

One of the very first items you’re going to want to check off is getting all appropriate paperwork in order. The list is a bit extensive, and is by no means an ‘across the board’ kind of deal. Precisely what you need often varies by state. Even worse is the fact that it just as often varies by county.  

The best way to find out exactly what you need is to check with a local real estate agent. Of course, I am always at your disposal and can help you sort out what you need for all of my surrounding areas. Just give me a ring, and I’ll help you out.

Lots and Lots of Hands-On Work

Aside from the mundane paperwork, you’re also going to want to work on your home itself. In this day and age, buyers are looking for the absolute best deal that they can get. Any updates or improvements that you can feasibly make are going to help your cause. While improving the actual home is important, so is working on your curb appeal. And, as always, the devil is in the details.

Precisely what you need to do, of course, depends on where you live, how quickly you need to sell and the laws governing real estate sells in your community. I’m just going to give you a general rundown of what is often required. However, this is not necessarily a complete list, and I advise you not to take it as such. Make sure that you contact a professional who can help to clarify exactly what is required of you so that all of your legal bases are covered. 

Dig Out Your Title Insurance Policy

Be prepared to provide proof of your title insurance. Most mortgage companies require that you present this before loan approval can be made, so it is advantageous to have it within arm’s reach before you nail down a buyer. Title insurance can be tricky business, and a professional needs to handle the whole situation. Customs of who pays for title insurance is different across the nation.  

You may recall hiring someone to ‘search your deed’ when you originally bought the home you are now selling. Title insurance is bought at that time, although you may not have even been aware that that was what you were doing.

It guarantees that the deed to your property was searched from the present back to its U.S. Patent. The insurance is for protection against human error because let’s face it: mistakes do happen. The process will also have to be done again with your current cell, but it’s convenient to have your prior paperwork nearby.  

Surveys Are Sometimes Required

Some states require by law that if a homebuyer is using a mortgage loan to purchase a property that mortgage surveys be done. This guarantees that the property is as is should be without any encroachments. An example of an encroachment might be that a neighbor has gone over the boundary line of your property with their garage, or that you might have put a fence in that is actually on their land.  

All improvements will also be noted on this survey. Many states also require that the boundary of the land be surveyed. Again, every place is different. Make sure you check with a professional to find out exactly what your specific laws require. 

Some States Demand Disclosure Statements

It isn’t uncommon for states to mandate that a seller provides potential buyers with certain disclosures about the property being sold. Some examples of disclosures are natural hazards, pest control, and lead paint. These few are certainly not the limit of what can be required of you.

An attorney or a qualified real estate agent, such as myself, can help you to determine what is needed from you specifically. 

A Pre-Inspection Report is Recommended

Technically, it isn’t normally a requirement for you to have a pre-inspection performed.  Regardless of whether you’re forced to or not, it’s a good idea. You see, most of the time certain inspections are going to have to be done before a mortgage lender will indeed offer the money for your buyer’s to purchase your property.

If some part of your home doesn’t pass inspection, you are in a whole wide world of very complicated trouble. Now, if you go ahead and pony up the cash to get a pre-inspection done, you have every opportunity to make repairs yourself, and before the mortgage company in your future ever finds out about the problems.  

Or, you could also choose to make allowances in your asking price for the repair of any faults once the home is out of your hands. Another route you could take is selling the home ‘As Is,’ but that’s a whole other ballgame unto itself.

I can’t say it enough, and you might be a little tired of it, but you need to check with a professional before assuming anything. The rules for these sorts of circumstances are just too diverse from location to location for you to take anything to chance. The last thing you want is to have legal repercussions from this sell hounding you years from now. 

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